Television

18 posts

American Horror Story 1984

American Horror Story is consistently well written (by the same people that do Glee) even when it’s consciously been written badly. The ninth season, 1984, is a classicover the top slasher picture with sporadic—but sparingly— blood heavy scenes. And just enough shocking moments to keep it original (there’s an oven scene to dieeeee for). 

american horror story

Set mostly in a typical American summer camp, a bunch of young adults are terrorised by a serial killer at large. But each character comes with a dicey past and their own demons, which provides discernible motivation for escaping LA and taking up residence at the camp. 

It’s not really until the third episode that it gets into the core plot. There seems to be a lot of padding in points and flashbacks so the chronology is a bit confusing, perhaps intentionally so (the season is only halfway through).

Eighties nostalgia translates really well on the small screen, particularly when done well like in ManiacStranger Thingsand Black Mirror. And AHS are renown for taking solid horror tropes and aesthetics and making them interesting still/again. And the eighties aerobics scene/s are everything though. Everything!

However, this season is the ultimate let down. I don’t say this lightly as I will totally stan AHS, even Roanoke. But don’t totally disregard it as it dallies around some pretty intriguing sub plots about the psychology around why serial killers kill, in an almost homage to the popular series Mindhunter. High fructose corn syrup was one theory why more people were being murdered…

With a noticeable absence of the usual cast of Sarah Paulson, Jessica Lange, Evan Peters or Kathy Bates, it is reasonably lacklustre. However, Angelica Ross is outstanding and almost makes up for the lack of usual talent. 

Angela Ross is amazing in American Horror Story 1984

Time to check out some more horror shows?

Barry

Barry (Bill Hader) is a hitman who launches his alter ego as an actor in a community theatre group. Barry wants to leave his life of crime and marine past behind him and embrace his new life as a performer. Of course, balancing double lives cannot come without consequences and one life must come out victorious. As an audience member, you almost feel sorry for him and his lack of emotional ability, lack of acting success and love interest gone awry. 

barry tv show

With 30 Emmy nominations, Barry is pegged as a tragicomedy. It’s straight faced darkness is as appealing as the deadpan comedy it effortlessly delivers. The levity is peppered in with the gloom so much so that you could be forgiven for being genre confused. But that’s a credit to Hader’s acting. 

barry tv series

It sets a new standard for the way comedy is delivered and executes the antihero device that modern television watchers are so drawn to these days. Barry evokes our sympathy, despite the fact that he is still a cold blooded, calculating killer. A fact which is easy to forget because it’s almost a by product of his narrative, rather than a central focus. 

Anthony Carrigan is a standout supporting actor in Barry and adds a comedic contrast to Barry’s darkness.

Should I watch Barry?

If you love dark comedies, this will blow your mind.

Why Women Kill

Why Women Kill tells the story of three relationships (and more) across three separate decades.

Beth Ann (Ginnifer Goodwin) is the perfect doting nineteen sixties housewife, Simone (Lucy Lui) is an eighties socialite and Kendall (Kirby Howell-Baptiste) is a modern day feminist in an open marriage. 

why women kill tv show

This is not a podcast cum documentary like the title would suggest but a camp dark comedy that looks at infidelity and negotiating romantic unions throughout time and how each woman, in her own ingenious way, deals with it. And sometimes with fatal consequences. But not without rediscovering who they are and what they truly want out of life. 

Infidelities, which sprout in their own ways with their own meanings pertaining to each couple, are revealed early on, so it’s clear the TV show is not about how infidelity spells the end of a relationship. In fact, this show depict how it’s the start of every good story.

why women kill tv
Photo credit: Jessica Brooks/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc.

All tied together by one house, Why Women Kill is like Desperate Housewives (both were written by Marc Cherry) mixed with Mad Men but on a heap of sugar. And the outfits are off the hook. It even has fun episode titles like I Killed Everyone He Did, But Backwards and in High Heels.

Should I watch Why Women Kill?

Yes, it’s super fun.

Cheat

Cheat is a British psychological thriller that tells a story in a tight four episodes. How often do you watch a dark TV series these days that has a four ep season? 

Cheat TV series

In Cheat, a university professor is stalked by her student, who quickly becomes more aggressive and conniving in her exploits. All the while, those around the professor are discrediting her as being paranoid, including her own husband who continuously dismisses her fears and even begins to side with the stalking student. As with any high stakes thriller and precarious dynamic between characters, it escalates and ultimately ends up fatal. 

The writers create great audience empathy with the protagonist. Her frustration and confusion is portrayed well and believable without being melodramatic. 

What’s odd about the telling of this story, is the choice to flash forward in the first episode to the conclusion. Essentially, giving away a chunk of the ending. Which isn’t a terrible spoiler as there aren’t any dramatic surprise twists (maybe one quite easily guessable one).

cheat tv series to watch

Other reviews have penned this as chilling but I think that’s hyperbole. It’s intriguing and watchable but it won’t give you nightmares.

Molly Windsor plays the student and her portrayal is excellent. I expect her to appear in many more delicious dramas and thrillers. Including the upcoming Traces (which features an all female production crew).

Should you watch Cheat?

Yes because the storytelling is riveting but it can be lagging at times.

You will like Cheat if you liked:

  • Gypsy
  • Deep Water
  • Black Swan

On Becoming a God in Central Florida

This dark comedy, set in the heart of the early nineties, explores the predatory and cult like nature that are multi level marketing schemes.

Forced to take on her husband’s downline (upline? I don’t know, I’m confused how it works) Krystal (Kirsten Dunst) has to keep up the constant hustle just to make ends meet. After realising that resisting isn’t getting her anywhere, she dives straight into the con herself like only a broke Florida housewife can. And hopes—and works hard— for the riches and fame that the company undyingly promises. 

on becoming a god in central florida

Dunst is exceptional in this. You are on her side from the very start and will spend every bit of your TV watching energy rooting for her to win (but also find a way out of the cult that is the featured MLM that sells cleaning products). 

This show is as much about Krystal’s fierceness and continuous resourcefulness as it is explicitly exposing every MLM that has ever existed. Not surprisingly, it taught me a lot about cult psychology and how MLM companies will take advantage of anyone, no matter how much they are struggling. Whilst the premise could certainly be true, it doesn’t appear to be based on any real life situation. However, the New York Post speculates on the likeness between the show’s company and Amway.

Another highlight of On Becoming a God in Central Florida is the epic eighties and nineties soundtrack.

Should I watch On Becoming a God in Central Florida?

Most definitely. It’s very satisfying.

You’ll like this if you like:

  • Why Women Kill
  • Lodge 49
  • Glow

American Gods

Watch on Prime.

Based on the awardwinning novel (published in 2001) of one of the world’s most loved authors, Neil Gaiman. American Gods is a dark and suspenseful spec fic TV series. The book and author has a cult following and it’s not hard to see why.

American Gods review on prime

With a promising opening credit sequence, it sets the scene for dark fantasy and neon horror. And yes, it’s intriguing as it sounds. 

The rich and complex scenes are concurrently fast paced and slow burning. Which develops the fullness of all the characters (based on deities), mainly the protagonist, Shadow. Who is every bit as his name suggests, in the best possible way. The story is told in a series of vignettes. Which are slowly revealed as connected by the main character (bad guy turned good). 

Each scene in American Gods is highly visual and palpable stories in and of themselves. From the elderly babcia who tells fortunes with tea leaves to the futuristic leader called Technology Boy. To the sexual representation of goddess Ishtar who literally devours her subjects with her genitals. The details are complete and thick. And provide a great mattress for the obvious tension in every scene between at least two of the characters. 

american gods review

American Gods is heavy with mythology and historical legend and how the universal learnings apply to all humanity in today’s world. And it’s all complemented with an evocative gothic soundtrack. 

Gaiman is one of the executive producers which gives comfort that there is some authenticity in regard to the novel. 

american gods gillian anderson
Gillian Anderson as Lucille Ball

Should I watch it American Gods?

Yes. Especially if you love your mythology. Also yes just to see the incredible Gillian Anderson play Lucille Ball-Riccardo,  Marilyn Monroe and David Bowie.

If you like TV shows based on books, read the Alias Grace review.

Bless this Mess

Watch on iTunes

The classic tree change sitcom, written by and starring Lake Bell, is a new comedy on the screen scene called Bless This Mess.

A fed up New York couple— a therapist, Bell, and music journalist, played by Kristen Bell’s husband, Dax Shepard— moves to Nebraska. In search of a simpler and possibly happier after they’ve purchased a farm. Upon arriving, they realise it’s actually a dilapidated and unworkable property (who buys before checking it out, seriously?). Nonetheless, they are committed to making it work. Of course, nothing ever lives up to the fantasy. And as a farmer’s daughter, I can confirm that farming is glorified by those who have never done it. Everything that can go wrong, does go wrong. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have a story.

The “fish out of water” theme in Bless This Mess is still a lovable approach to watch. Who doesn’t relate to getting judged for wearing their activewear to the corner store? But it’s hard to forgive the irritable nature of the main characters. Especially because as the neighbours point out, ‘you don’t just decide to be a farmer.’

Bless this Mess review

Bless This Mess is quite cliché but it’s redeeming in that the main characters are charming and naively enthusiastic and have a great, respectful relationship. Until the cracks in their marriage start to appear as their ill purchased house begins to crack.

Bless this Mess review tv
Image credit: Fox News

However, the side cast (think Lennon Parham from Parks and Rec and David Koechner from Anchorman) are much more interesting and funny. Albeit stereotypical small town views and narratives. 

Still very early on in its life, I’ll be disheartened if this gets renewed for more than two seasons and genius, relatable comedies like Alone Together didn’t. 

Should I watch Bless This Mess?

Yeah, I guess. Just lower your expectations. A lot.

Bonding TV series

Watch on Netflix

Bonding is loosely based on real life experiences. This original web series details the life of a moonlighting dominatrix and her gay best friend, who becomes her assistant. It was created by Rightor Doyle who has previously worked as a bodyguard for a dominatrix. 

bonding tv series

Mistress May, the protagonist, who is played by Zoe Levin, is inspiring. She takes absolutely no shit from men both in her personal and professional life. Of course, this poses problems when men genuinely want to get close to her and ends up costing her relationships. 

The characters are rich and well rounded and experience rapid transformation and development, which is faster than most modern TV series. What’s most interesting is that the episodes are significantly shorter than most shows. Which is quite a feat to represent such fast transformation within the characters. 

There are very cute and enviable dynamics between the entire character set, which will appeal to a millennial audience. There is something completely magical and unique about all the supporting cast who actually pull focus a bit, in particular D’Arcy Carden, which you will know as being Janet from The Good Place.

bonding tv series on netflix
Zoe Levin in Bonding

Albeit an inaccurate and glamorous portrayal of sex work, this show is not so much about sex or sex work. This show is about human relationships.

I cannot wait for season two of Bonding, which is speculated to be released late in the year. Hopefully. 

Should I watch it?

Definitely.

You will like Bonding if you liked:

  • Easy
  • Special
  • Sex Education
tv shows

The rise of shorter TV shows

The final episode of Game of Thrones had a runtime of 85 minutes. And while this lengthy runtime obviously works for such a complex and intricate TV shows. But not everyone has the time, energy and focus to sit through such lengthy episodes no matter how acclaimed or award winning they are. The introduction of streaming services like Netflix and Stan and original web series has done a lot to change the way we consume television programs. But one thing has remained the same: runtime.

tv shows

Most TV shows run anywhere between 10 – 100 minutes. With the average “hour-long” show running for about 42 minutes and the “half-hour” shows running from about 22 minutes to the full 30, minus commercial breaks (remember commercial breaks?). Most TV shows on streaming services have stuck with this tradition for the most part. Even though they don’t have to adhere to traditional broadcast time slots or commercial breaks. This has led to TV shows with longer runtimes like The Crown. Which has an average runtime of about 60 minutes.

However, streaming companies like Netflix have started realising that shows with long runtimes may not be as popular as they were in the past. Studies have shown that most viewers have short attention spans which they tend to split with their smartphones, tablets, and laptops while watching TV. Their potential antidote to this is the short form episode. Netflix has begun showcasing a small selection of shows with short episodes that run for a maximum of 17 minutes. Shows like I Think You Should Leave and Bonding, It’s Bruno! feature bite-sized plots and short form episodes and seasons that can be completed in the course of a night.

The start of short run times

TV shows with such short runtimes were traditionally reserved for children’s channels like Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon as it’s quite a challenge to act out fully realised story in such a short time. All whilst holding the attention of busy minds. Still, it seems like Netflix is creating more shows that can be told in short chunks as a way to fill the 15-minute per episode niche. For example, the Netflix show, I Think You Should Leave squeezes about five scenes into its short runtime. This meant that the show’s scriptwriters and actors had to make the most of every scene. 

tv shows that are short

However, this format of shorter TV shows is only successful for a specific type of show. Such as those with low stakes and simple storylines that are not compromised as a result of the time constraint. But while this format may be great for some it raises the question: is it possible to act out a complex storyline in that time? And enough to satisfy the viewer and hook them into the journey?

Well, the new Netflix show Bonding attempted this with a fresh and complex story arc which left viewers with mixed reactions. While some viewers appreciated the show’s shorter runtime, others felt that it didn’t manage to build a strong enough foundation for its finale. I, of course, loved it.

TV show timing and plots

While there will always be shows like Game of Thrones that have interesting plots and storylines that can fill an hour without tiring out its viewers, this type of show just won’t work in a 15-minute format. The most compelling TV shows feature several moving parts that make it necessary for them to have longer runtimes. This allows the show to fully develop without having the viewers feel like they are being dragged along. That’s not to say that the idea of TV shows with short runtimes should be scrapped entirely. There’s certainly a place for them. And I predict we’ll see more and more of them in due course (alongside longer shows as well).

In a way, it helps clear up the air surrounding modern TV shows as streaming companies can now easily classify their shows for viewers. The hour-long format can be reserved for epic shows like Game of Thrones, thoughtful comedies and dramas can fall into the 30-minute format while the 15-minute long shows can serve as a filler for those who don’t have enough patience for longer shows. Especially, if you like a quick resolve.

What’s your favourite length of show?

Breaking Bad writing tips

Breaking Bad had almost 3 million viewers by season five. Sure there’s a number of contributing factors to its enormous success and one of those defining factors is its gripping storyline and complex characters. There are a lot of lessons on successful writing that you can take away from these popular TV shows. Here I’ve listed the most prominent from a few of my favourites:

breaking bad

What I learnt from Breaking Bad (SPOILER ALERT)

  1. Take your character just far enough but not too quickly. For example, when Jane (Jesse’s girlfriend) died, the writers consciously wrote in that Walt wouldn’t save her from dying as opposed to killing her directly.
  2. Put the characters in difficult challenges and let them get themselves out.
  3. Be flexible. Jesse was originally written to be a temporary character but worked so well, they had to rewrite him in.
  4. Have endless discussions, with your cowriters, yourself, your keyboard, they character themselves. Only then will you be able to write what is best for the story.
  5. The location of Breaking Bad very much influenced the story. Albuquerque tourism offered discounts to entice film crews to work there and once they started filming there, the writers found that the colours, the landscape and scenery, the way the sky sat all influenced the story.

You might like Writing tips from New Girl.


For more about how to write, read my writing blog.

Why do we watch reality TV?

Millions (literally millions) of people watch reality TV shows in Australia. But have you ever thought why do we watch reality TV? Here are three core and defining reasons that could be at the heart of our voyeuristic leisure activity.

We need comparison in reality TV

Comparison helps us to recalibrate and set expectations for ourselves and our own lives. By getting to watch people in “real life” without having to interact with them and create a genuine emotional connection with them, we can engage in this indulgent device.

The ‘…appeal of reality shows is the chance they provide for us to compare ourselves with other people involved in situations that we may wish we could be in, or are glad we’re not.’

It’s also one of the most effective ways to live through an experience without actually having to live through it and all the risks, damage and emotions that it can involve.

why we watch reality tv

Reality TV digs up empathy

One of the most fundamental human traits is empathy and it’s the cornerstone of human behaviour. It has even been identified as a key emotion in effective leadership.

Witnessing real people go through real situations can evoke deep core empathy. And watching reality tv is not as much about witnessing humiliation as it is about eliciting empathy.

Having empathy is our fundamental mechanism to understanding one another and when we understand something, we are at peace with it. And some people (Buddhists etc) could argue that discovering/chasing peace is at the core of our purpose.

When we understand something, we are at peace with it.

Reality TV creates connection

As with most consumed entertainment, talking about it creates connections with individuals that are in your life (and not behind a screen). Have you noticed how often you reach out to a co-worker or family member when there’s a silence to say ‘hey… did you see such and such on show name last night?’

Watching reality TV can even be good for you!

Binge watching is the new black

Binge watching TV is an actual official thing according to this 2015 survey carried out by TiVo where ninety-two percent of the respondents admitted that they usually watched multiple episodes of a television program in rapid succession. Australia is the eighth highest binge watching country in the world.

Most of us are guilty (don’t feel guilty!) of this, getting our snacks lined up and settling into our most comfortable position to complete an entire series in a single night. 

‘60% of all TV viewers report watching two or more episodes of a show in a row.’

binge watching tv

But why do we binge watch TV? 

Binge watching TV is a relatively new phenomenon (well, some of us have been doing it for way longer than we should have) which is mostly driven by the ease at which these TV shows are offered up to us. Over the years, there have been several advances in technology that have changed the way we react to media. The introduction of recording devices like the VCR and TiVo allowed people to record shows and movies without having to rely on a TV schedule. It also allowed people to share these shows with their friends and create playlists of popular shows. Seems so retro now, doesn’t it?

DVD and streaming services took this a step further by giving users to entire seasons without having to wait for weekly episodes. This level of access to lots of episodes of the same show, which were originally intended to be viewed once a week is the major starting point for our binge watching.

I remember the first time I seriously binge watched a show. It was about eight years ago and I was housesitting a friend’s house. I told myself I might as well watch twenty minutes of Breaking Bad. This is not hyperbole when I say that I watched it for six hours straight. And thus my love of binge watching was born. 

binge watching

For the love of binge watching

Another reason we love it so much is that binge watching TV actually makes us feel more relaxed. People take solace in the world they choose to tune into and feel more tranquil when viewing this alternate world. However, this relaxed feeling disappears as soon as you turn the TV off and we are subconsciously aware of this. This keeps us watching episode after episode to keep that relaxed feeling going. Can you relate to this relaxation addiction? 

Finally, scriptwriters have caught on to the fact that most viewers binge watch their shows and have begun writing for it. This is why I love the entertainment industry. Unlike many other industries, they adapt to their demographics’ behaviour as soon as they notice trends in data. 

Most modern TV shows now feature engaging storylines with complex and surprising cliff-hangers to keep their viewers glued. And as we’ve looked at, TV shows are varying their length to suit all sorts of viewers.

Do you remember your first binge watch? What was it?

New Girl and writing tips

New Girl, starring Zooey Deschanel and created by Elizabeth Merriweather, has a team of talented writers (11 during the first season and 15 during the second season) and each episode can take a few weeks or more to write and ‘…as the show’s jokes rely on the actors’ performance instead of perfectly constructed punch lines…’ the actors are encouraged to pitch story ideas. 

new girl writing

What I learnt from New Girl

  1. Just write about what and who you know and make it something you are proud of.
  2. Let people help. Collaboration can make your project better – especially in writing for TV.
  3. Don’t write a joke for the joke’s sake (especially a runner – an ongoing joke), make sure it fits, step back and view the whole piece to see if it works.
  4. Story lines and processes can be messy and organic – it’s more realistic.
  5. People hooking up always creates great conflict and audience interest. It’s not always the resolve of a situation but can be the start of one.
  6. Walking is great for remedying “writer’s block”.

You may also like Breaking Bad writing tips.

Murderess… Netflix’s Alias Grace series

‘All the same, Murderess is a strong word to have attached to you. It has a smell to it, that word— musky and oppressive, like dead flowers in a vase. Sometimes at night I whisper it over to myself: Murderess, Murderess. It rustles, like a taffeta skirt across the floor. Murderer is merely brutal. It’s like a hammer, or a lump of metal. I would rather be a murderess than a murderer, if those are the only choices.’ Quote from the novel, Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood.

Alias Grace review

Alias Grace is a six part Netflix series adapted from Margaret Atwood’s (one of my favourite authors, who also penned such game changers as The Handmaid’s Tale) bestselling novel. Atwood previously wrote about Miss Marks in her 1970s play The Servant Girl. What’s intriguing is that it’s based on the 1843 true story of Grace Marks and Jason McDermott. Written for the screen by award winning screenwriter, Sarah Polley, who is reported to have spent a couple of decades— first approaching Atwood at age seventeen— trying to bring Alias Grace to life. ‘People know they need to look brutally and honestly at the world,’ Polley says about the appeal of Atwood’s work.

The series, starring Sarah Gadon, is a well constructed and haunting story. It details the murder of Thomas Kinnear and Nancy Montgomery by Marks and McDermott. It has been a popular watch. After only a few weeks on Netflix and Rolling Stone dubbed it ‘…the most relevant show on television.’

Author of Alias Grace, Margaret Atwood

Atwood, who is a celebrated feminist writer, highlighted throughout the novel the differences in the way female and male murders are treated. And how they are perceived and regarded by society (then and now). And, of course, takes an intimate look at The Woman Question

Atwood has stated about the protagonist and real life Grace ‘…The interesting thing is the way everybody projects their ideas onto Grace.’

Leaves us questioning (as many of the characters are also) is she a victim of the situation and ‘… a good girl with a pliable nature…’ [page 25] (and trying to make the best of) or is she a cold blooded murderer and ‘…cunning and devious…’ [page 25]. It also highlights how a murder is not in and of itself. That people, especially women, are three dimensional, even if they commit what are considered to be evil acts. 

Atwood said in this interview with her publisher, Penguin Randomhouse: ‘Other people took the view that women, when they got going, were inherently more evil than men, and that it was therefore Grace who had instigated the crime and led McDermott on. So you had a real split between woman as demon and woman as pathetic.’

Who will like Alias Grace?

It holds something for most audience members. It comprises history, feminist overtones, mental health, supernatural, domesticity (specifically quilting is used as a prominent leitmotif) and— of course— romance. And whilst it may be historical, the themes and concerns are just as present today. Solidifying the necessity to storytell and excavate these themes until the light that touches them to perpetrate radical change. Building on the increasing popularity of flawed female characters and unreliable narrators that we are equally harrowed by and empathetic towards. In the vein of Gone Girl, Girl on a Train, Fates and Furies and Jessica Jones. We are now embracing the idea the women are more multifaceted and whole than they have ever been depicted and that even the most determined murderess still has the capacity to love, feel empathy, create long lasting and meaningful friendships.

Additionally I found the recent series of The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace both pleasingly true to the novels. The details, the same mysterious atmosphere, ambiguous ending and pertinent premises come across exactly as I anticipated.

Alias Grace is an easier watch that the harrowing The Handmaid’s Tale. And whilst it will question your sensitivities and will haunt you for at least a week afterwards, it will not leave you in terror like The Handmaid’s Tale. Knowing it’s in the past and not a probable speculative fictional future.  

What’s more, be sure to keep your eyes peeled for a cameo appearance by Margaret Atwood herself.

You’ll love Alias Grace if you liked…

Making a Murderer
The Handmaid’s Tale
The Sinner
Top of the Lake

TV nerds that we love

Imagine the drudgery that would afflict television if computer technology was never invented? There’d be so many fewer hacking shows to watch. What would we even do with all that spare time? Invent computers, probably…Has anyone settled on the collective noun for a group hackers, by the way?

Here’s a brief list of some of our favourite male TV nerds:

Huck (Diego Munoz) from Scandal

Diego Munaz

Played by Guillermo Diaz

A gruff hacker in our favourite crisis management team (led by Olivia Pope) in Scandal, Huck is a former CIA agent that is light on conversation but heavy on mystery. ‘…Low-key and quietly brilliant Huck…’  proffers a sturdy air that you can’t help but interpret as reliable.

For an added bonus the actor that plays Huck is gay and has a tattoo of Madonna’s face on his arm… what’s not to love?

Walter O’Brien from </Scorpion>

walter from scorpion - tv nerds

Played by Elyes Gabel

The show and character was inspired by the real life Walter O’Brien who is a hacker and computer expert. At only eleven years old, he hacked into NASA (just like the real life Walter O’Brien did) and has since been commissioned by Homeland to work for them.

One of Walter’s most endearing traits is his rapid connection with his on again, off again love interest (Paige)’s son.

The TV show, Scorpion, was suggested to producers by O’Brien with the hopes that it would attract more employees to his company. Now that’s an expensive recruitment drive!

Abed Nadir from Community

Abed from Community - tv nerds

Played by Danny Pudi

A personal favourite of mine, with his russet skin and his adorable quirks and of course, his obsessive love of television (relatable), Abed is the full package.

It is alluded to in Community that Abed displays characteristics of Asperger’s Syndrome and doesn’t pick up on emotional or social cues as well as the other characters.

Abed also has a strong and admirable life philosophy and self esteem:

‘I’ve got self esteem falling out of my butt. That’s why I was willing to change for you guys because when you really know who you are and what you like about yourself, changing for other people isn’t such a big deal.’

And whilst he may be no match for his counterpart Troy who is played by Donald Glover (you all know him from Childish Gambino fame) our boy can rap in Spanish.

And in English…

Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory

jim parsons - tv nerds

Played by Jim Parsons

Everyone’s favourite pedant and TV nerd, Sheldon (pardon me, that’s Dr. Sheldon Lee Cooper, B.S., M.S., M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D.), is as fresh faced as he is intelligent. As a theoretical physicist, Sheldon steals the show with his prodigal abilities, stilted personality traits and particularities and his top Theremin playing.

Plus those over expressive eyebrows.

Elliot Alderson from Mr Robot

rami malek - tv nerds

Played by Rami Malek

Struggling with dissociative disorder, clinical depression and social anxiety disorder, Elliot is the people’s cyber vigilante that “hacks for good” on the intriguing Mr Robot. Played by the enigmatic Malek, of Egyptian heritage, who is also a twin. The show is often praised for its accuracy when it comes to detailing their hack-ventures and technological authenticity.

Elliot’s pet fish is called Qwerty and isn’t that just the best name for a nerd pet?

Did you know: Malek took typing lessons to prepare for his role of quick fingered hacker Elliot? 

Bertram Gilfoyle from Silicon Valley

Gilfoyle silicon valley

Played by Martin Starr

With monotone delivery and an acerbic tongue Bertram, known as Gilfoyle is the long haired, Satan worshipping Senior Security Architect in Richard’s hacker group in the HBO series, Silicon Valley.

I could literally name the entire core group of start up-preneurs in Silicon Valley but since Martin Starr is a bonafide favourite, Gilfoyle gets the mention. Martin Starr gets bonus points for his entrenched nerdism from his Freaks and Geeks days.

Did you know: in season two of Silicon Valley, Gilfoyle named the computer servers Anton, after Satanist, Anton LaVey. 

Chidi Anagonye from The Good Place

chidi the good place is one of tv nerds

Played by William Jackson Harper

Unabashedly one of my favourite characters on one of my favourite TV shows is Chidi. Chidi is a philosophy professor with a passion for moral ethics who was born in Nigeria and moved to Senegal. The name Chidi means ‘God lives’, which is fitting symbolism for The Good Place and even for the eternal code of ethics that the character abides.

‘Who needs a soulmate, anyway? My soulmate will be… books,’ Chidi Anagonye.


Who has been missed? Share your favourites below.