Drama

2 posts

Watchmen

Based on the original comics of the same name in the 1980s, Watchmen is a real gift of a television show. The first episode aired in October 2019 and is a powerful and essential watch.

It covers important social justice issues, particularly racism, which means this is more than just entertainment; it’s a prose on an alternative world (or nearby version of it) and what things will look like if we don’t get our shit together.

watchmen tv show

It follows vigilantes fighting for the justice that we all want to see in society but have been outlawed. Naturally, there is violence with plenty of fight scenes. But they are exacting and succinct because the show relies on other strong factors to make it great, rather than a twelve minute, over choreographed fight scene. 

The main protagonist (a newly created character) is a powerful, commanding woman called Angela Abar (played by Regina King) who lives a double life and has an extensive backstory and layers to keep her incredibly intriguing. King purports of her character ‘This woman is complex, she’s flawed. Heroes struggle, too.’ Which is probably in part due to the fact that seven of the twelve writers are women.

The show’s creator, Damon Lindelof, commented on being a white man creating a show that focuses on black history:

‘I’ve made a career of basically putting white people on billboards, and I keep making television shows about really attractive men in their mid-40s who are having existential and spiritual crises. I’m in a position to do something different and this is something that I care about, too.’ 

The spec fic masterpiece has perspicuous storytelling, a brilliant cast and ever more brilliant soundtrack. Even if you aren’t a superhero comic fan and can’t seem to get into other DC and Marvel shows, Watchmen is the one that you will.

Should I watch Watchmen?

Without a shadow of a doubt.

You will like Watchmen if you like:

  • Any superhero and villain shows or movies. 
  • Castle Rock
  • The 2009 film version of Watchmen

Living with Yourself

living with yourself on netflix

Paul Rudd and Aisling Bea… is almost too much to handle on one screen. But TWO Paul Rudds in the one show? Well. Mind explosion. And if that’s not enough, there’s a special guest spot from Alia Shakwat. 

Miles (Rudd) is living a mundane existence that is rapidly aging him in Living with Yourself. So he impulsively decides to spend hard earned savings (that was meant for fertility treatments) on a spa day, recommended by a friend. 

And then he wakes up buried, wrapped in plastic. Upon returning home he discovers a clone of himself. But that’s not all that has changed. Something within him has come to life. Well, within one of the versions of him. Things are thrilling again— the air feels better, he no longer needs glasses and he has the confidence to kick arse during pitch meetings at work. 

And the other (original) version, remains downtrodden by life, devoid of colour and like the juice has been completely sucked out of him. 

living with yourself
Image credit: Netflix

Surely, it’s most people’s fantasy to be cloned or at least have a clone to help with the housework. As you’d expect, Miles starts putting his duplicate to good use by standing in at parties and so on. The trouble starts when people start preferring the clone. It’s a new and unexplored complexity to be jealous of yourself. 

Most episodes alternate between the two Miles’ points of view, with a bonus viewpoint of his wife which strengthens the plot and adds additional dimensions through these perspectives. 

It’s an interesting and non confronting look at identity, without being emotionally wrenching like how many dramedies are constructed these days. This is not a criticism, I like it, it’s just nice to have the reprieve and not have to have the dread of what is around the narrative corner. Plus, it retains its stamina throughout the whole season. 

You might need to binge watch because the chronology is not the easiest to follow. Any excuse to binge watch, right?