Comedies

6 posts

Living with Yourself

living with yourself on netflix

Paul Rudd and Aisling Bea… is almost too much to handle on one screen. But TWO Paul Rudds in the one show? Well. Mind explosion. And if that’s not enough, there’s a special guest spot from Alia Shakwat. 

Miles (Rudd) is living a mundane existence that is rapidly aging him in Living with Yourself. So he impulsively decides to spend hard earned savings (that was meant for fertility treatments) on a spa day, recommended by a friend. 

And then he wakes up buried, wrapped in plastic. Upon returning home he discovers a clone of himself. But that’s not all that has changed. Something within him has come to life. Well, within one of the versions of him. Things are thrilling again— the air feels better, he no longer needs glasses and he has the confidence to kick arse during pitch meetings at work. 

And the other (original) version, remains downtrodden by life, devoid of colour and like the juice has been completely sucked out of him. 

living with yourself
Image credit: Netflix

Surely, it’s most people’s fantasy to be cloned or at least have a clone to help with the housework. As you’d expect, Miles starts putting his duplicate to good use by standing in at parties and so on. The trouble starts when people start preferring the clone. It’s a new and unexplored complexity to be jealous of yourself. 

Most episodes alternate between the two Miles’ points of view, with a bonus viewpoint of his wife which strengthens the plot and adds additional dimensions through these perspectives. 

It’s an interesting and non confronting look at identity, without being emotionally wrenching like how many dramedies are constructed these days. This is not a criticism, I like it, it’s just nice to have the reprieve and not have to have the dread of what is around the narrative corner. Plus, it retains its stamina throughout the whole season. 

You might need to binge watch because the chronology is not the easiest to follow. Any excuse to binge watch, right?

What to watch after Fleabag

So you’ve finished watching Fleabag and kind of, sort of, gotten over the Hot Priest. After you’ve come down from the absolute genius that is Fleabag you’ll be scouting around for your next “dark and dry” to keep fuelling the fire if your inner unexpressed angst. 

I don’t know about you but I am grieving the end of the show and miss it like a beloved friend has moved away. Which is silly because it’s *just* a TV show. Right?

Here are some shows that you can watch next:

This Way Up

I love a post breakdown recovery series. Irish comedian, Aisling Bea, has created a very witty series called This Way Up about getting your life together in your thirties.

Back to Life

what to watch after fleabag back to life

By the producers of Fleabag, Back to Life is about a woman in her thirties returning to her hometown after serving a jail sentence. 

Pure

This is a little hidden gem, Pure, tackles some huge, unexplored issues such as sex addiction and intrusive thoughts. Be warned: it gets pretty real.

Crashing 

This is Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s other show but Crashing didn’t quite grab me. You might like it though.

Game Face

what to watch after fleabag game face

A hilarious, modern look at being a hot mess in your thirties. Not a unique TV premise but I can’t get enough. Can you? Tell me what you think of Game Face.

Finding Joy

what to watch after fleabag finding joy

Finding Joy is about a woman struggling to get her life together in her thirties… I mean, you get the idea, right?

Okay, I should rename this post from what to watch after Fleabag to ‘shows about women in their thirties’ but that’s not as fun. 

Not sure what to watch next? Read the television blog.

Barry

Barry (Bill Hader) is a hitman who launches his alter ego as an actor in a community theatre group. Barry wants to leave his life of crime and marine past behind him and embrace his new life as a performer. Of course, balancing double lives cannot come without consequences and one life must come out victorious. As an audience member, you almost feel sorry for him and his lack of emotional ability, lack of acting success and love interest gone awry. 

barry tv show

With 30 Emmy nominations, Barry is pegged as a tragicomedy. It’s straight faced darkness is as appealing as the deadpan comedy it effortlessly delivers. The levity is peppered in with the gloom so much so that you could be forgiven for being genre confused. But that’s a credit to Hader’s acting. 

barry tv series

It sets a new standard for the way comedy is delivered and executes the antihero device that modern television watchers are so drawn to these days. Barry evokes our sympathy, despite the fact that he is still a cold blooded, calculating killer. A fact which is easy to forget because it’s almost a by product of his narrative, rather than a central focus. 

Anthony Carrigan is a standout supporting actor in Barry and adds a comedic contrast to Barry’s darkness.

Should I watch Barry?

If you love dark comedies, this will blow your mind.

Why Women Kill

Why Women Kill tells the story of three relationships (and more) across three separate decades.

Beth Ann (Ginnifer Goodwin) is the perfect doting nineteen sixties housewife, Simone (Lucy Lui) is an eighties socialite and Kendall (Kirby Howell-Baptiste) is a modern day feminist in an open marriage. 

why women kill tv show

This is not a podcast cum documentary like the title would suggest but a camp dark comedy that looks at infidelity and negotiating romantic unions throughout time and how each woman, in her own ingenious way, deals with it. And sometimes with fatal consequences. But not without rediscovering who they are and what they truly want out of life. 

Infidelities, which sprout in their own ways with their own meanings pertaining to each couple, are revealed early on, so it’s clear the TV show is not about how infidelity spells the end of a relationship. In fact, this show depict how it’s the start of every good story.

why women kill tv
Photo credit: Jessica Brooks/CBS ©2019 CBS Interactive, Inc.

All tied together by one house, Why Women Kill is like Desperate Housewives (both were written by Marc Cherry) mixed with Mad Men but on a heap of sugar. And the outfits are off the hook. It even has fun episode titles like I Killed Everyone He Did, But Backwards and in High Heels.

Should I watch Why Women Kill?

Yes, it’s super fun.

On Becoming a God in Central Florida

This dark comedy, set in the heart of the early nineties, explores the predatory and cult like nature that are multi level marketing schemes.

Forced to take on her husband’s downline (upline? I don’t know, I’m confused how it works) Krystal (Kirsten Dunst) has to keep up the constant hustle just to make ends meet. After realising that resisting isn’t getting her anywhere, she dives straight into the con herself like only a broke Florida housewife can. And hopes—and works hard— for the riches and fame that the company undyingly promises. 

on becoming a god in central florida

Dunst is exceptional in this. You are on her side from the very start and will spend every bit of your TV watching energy rooting for her to win (but also find a way out of the cult that is the featured MLM that sells cleaning products). 

This show is as much about Krystal’s fierceness and continuous resourcefulness as it is explicitly exposing every MLM that has ever existed. Not surprisingly, it taught me a lot about cult psychology and how MLM companies will take advantage of anyone, no matter how much they are struggling. Whilst the premise could certainly be true, it doesn’t appear to be based on any real life situation. However, the New York Post speculates on the likeness between the show’s company and Amway.

Another highlight of On Becoming a God in Central Florida is the epic eighties and nineties soundtrack.

Should I watch On Becoming a God in Central Florida?

Most definitely. It’s very satisfying.

You’ll like this if you like:

  • Why Women Kill
  • Lodge 49
  • Glow

Bless this Mess

Watch on iTunes

The classic tree change sitcom, written by and starring Lake Bell, is a new comedy on the screen scene called Bless This Mess.

A fed up New York couple— a therapist, Bell, and music journalist, played by Kristen Bell’s husband, Dax Shepard— moves to Nebraska. In search of a simpler and possibly happier after they’ve purchased a farm. Upon arriving, they realise it’s actually a dilapidated and unworkable property (who buys before checking it out, seriously?). Nonetheless, they are committed to making it work. Of course, nothing ever lives up to the fantasy. And as a farmer’s daughter, I can confirm that farming is glorified by those who have never done it. Everything that can go wrong, does go wrong. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have a story.

The “fish out of water” theme in Bless This Mess is still a lovable approach to watch. Who doesn’t relate to getting judged for wearing their activewear to the corner store? But it’s hard to forgive the irritable nature of the main characters. Especially because as the neighbours point out, ‘you don’t just decide to be a farmer.’

Bless this Mess review

Bless This Mess is quite cliché but it’s redeeming in that the main characters are charming and naively enthusiastic and have a great, respectful relationship. Until the cracks in their marriage start to appear as their ill purchased house begins to crack.

Bless this Mess review tv
Image credit: Fox News

However, the side cast (think Lennon Parham from Parks and Rec and David Koechner from Anchorman) are much more interesting and funny. Albeit stereotypical small town views and narratives. 

Still very early on in its life, I’ll be disheartened if this gets renewed for more than two seasons and genius, relatable comedies like Alone Together didn’t. 

Should I watch Bless This Mess?

Yeah, I guess. Just lower your expectations. A lot.